Knowing The Signs of Plumbing TroubleKnowing The Signs of Plumbing Trouble


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Knowing The Signs of Plumbing Trouble

After my house started to smell bad, I assumed that the scent was wafting from my teenager's room. Unfortunately, a careful inspection of the problem didn't turn up any results, so I knew I had a real problem on my hands. I asked a friend to come over to help me to find the source of the smell, and they immediately mentioned the smell of sewer gas. I realized that I needed to work with a professional plumber to get things resolved. I called out an expert, and they talked with me about the common signs of plumbing problems. Check out this blog to learn more yourself.

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How To Install A Precast Kitchen Sink

As you kitchen ages, you will probably upgrade a few elements over the years. For instance, you might make style changes to the room by repainting the cabinets or updating the flooring. These changes can make your other elements look outdated and out of style since they no longer match the rest of your kitchen. If your kitchen sink looks out of date, you should definitely consider changing it. Most kitchens have stainless steel, drop down sinks. They come in standardized sizes, so you can find a variety of replacements. This article explains how to install a precast, drop down sink.

Remove the Old Sink

To remove the old sink, you just need a utility knife, an adjustable wrench and two wrenches for the mounting bracket bolts. First, shut off the quarter-turn valves for the hot and cold water and unhook them from the bottom of the faucets with the adjustable wrench. You can usually remove the PVC drain pipe nuts by hand, but you might need the wrench to get them going. Leave the P-trap attached to the wall, but remove the vertical intake pipe.

Now you need to cut the seal along the top edge of the sink lip with the utility knife. At this point, you should be able to lift the sink off of the counter.

Installing the New Sink

If you have a new sink that is the exact size and depth of your old sink, installing it is a basically a reversal of the removal steps. Most importantly, you need to seal the edges with plumber's putty before you tighten the mounting brackets. In fact, it is a good idea to first drop the sink into the counter top hole and make sure all the water lines and pipes will fit. You will see that the bottom edge of the sink lip has a groove. Fill this entire groove with a liberal amount of plumber's putty and then place the sink down again. All of the excess putty will squeeze out of the lip, onto the counter top. Wipe it up and then crawl under the cabinet so you can start to tighten the brackets. As you tighten them, more of the putty will squeeze out. But, you don't need to wipe it up immediately -- just do it after the sink is fully tightened.

Once the sink is secure, you can easily reattach the drain pipes and waterlines. Remember to hand-tighten the drain pipe nuts. If you use a wrench, you could over-tighten and damage the piece. If you need additional help installing your new sink, contact a professional at Brown's Plumbing. With a new sink in place, your counter will look fresh and updated.